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   Novato Live Well Network: Growing a Healthy Community from the Ground Up!
 

CONTACT INFORMATION:
NovatoLiveWell@comcast.net
(415) 897-2302
www.NovatoLiveWell.org

Novato Live Well Network
P.O. Box 1647
Novato, CA 94948-1647
 

 
 
 
GARDENS

NOVATO COMMUNITY GARDENS:
Would you like to see a network of community and neighborhood gardens in Novato? If so, visit our community garden webpage to learn more. We "almost" have a site off of Novato Blvd. 1/2 mile west of San Marin Drive. We have successfully drilled for water on the site and have been working with the City of Novato to lease the property. Click here to learn more.

THE SCHOOL GARDEN CONNECTION
Let a child plant a seed, water it, watch it grow and that child will pick the vegetable or fruit and eat it! Children and gardens mix well. The garden experience invites the child to touch, taste, experience and expand. Children exposed to the wonderful world of gardening are also exposed to the wonderful tastes that the garden has to offer. Often times this experience translates to a more openness about eating new vegetables and foods, including those served at the school lunch.

FOR SCHOOL GARDEN SUPPORT LINKS,
SCROLL DOWN TOWARDS THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE
AND CHECK ON THE LINKS ON THE RIGHT SIDE

SCHOOL COMPOST CLUB WORKSHOP HELD APRIL 25, 2009
We celebrated Earth Day with earthworms! In this workshop we considered ways to dispose of school lunchroom waste through recycling and composting while learning how to increasing student/staff awareness and participation in the classroom. The workshop was held at the Conservation Corps North Bay - Bel Marin Keys Site. The cost would have normally been $60 per person, but with a grant by a North Bay Corporation grant we were only able to charge $30 per participant. In addition, the Compost Club (www.CompostClub.org) was able to acquire additional funding to build and donate 7 worm bins and worms valued at $150 each to each school that participated. This event was sponsored by: Novato Live Well Network and North Bay Corporation, and Hosted by Conservation Corps North Bay.

In the Fall of 2009, we will continue to provide support and guidance to participating schools and organizations. Stay tuned for more...!
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LUNCHROOM WASTE--THE WORM STORY: It's been one year since Lu Sutton Elementary School in Novato had a Waste Audit. And, 6 months since the hungry worms came to the school. Read about one mom's effort to save the world one-bite-at-a-time: The revealing story with pictures!

Worm

THE SCHOOL COMPOST CLUB CAME TO NOVATO!
SEE pictures of what we did: Women & Worms
On Saturday, May 17, 2008 a group of dedicated teachers, parents and students attended the "Compost Club Workshop". Read Pacific Sun article "Going Compostal" by Annie Spiegaleman, Dirt Diva.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COMPOST CLUB WORKSHOP : The Compost Club leaders (www.compostclub.org) taught us all about school lunchroom garbage: the plastics, papers, leftovers, and uneaten food that ends up in the trash. We learned how to start a recycling program -- because it's really not just about worms! And, of course, we learned all about worms: what they like to eat, how they like to live, and we even got to meet them in person! Did you know worms laid eggs? We also learned about the various composting systems and the challenges of finding the right one in a school environment. And finally, we got to build worm bins to take back to our schools and start a worm composting system to deal with school lunchroom waste.

WORM FACTS:
1. Worms lay eggs. Each egg can contain 4-6 baby worms!
2. Worms really are vegans: have you ever found a cow or a chicken underground? But, if you do feed worms meat and dairy, they will eat it -- they don't know better. And, you may find more flies and other critters that you really don't want to attract. Best to stick to veggies and fruits!
3. Worms should not eat process food, like junk food. They also get tummy aches and it's not good for them!
4. Worms don't like acidic food, do not feed them citrus foods -- and lay low on the tomatoes.
5. For more worm fun facts let Herman the worm teach you!

DID YOU KNOW?: Food scraps and other organic material take up about half of all landfill space. They produce methane gas, 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Landfills are considered the lead human source of methane emission, according to the US EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program. Both Dr. Sally Brown and the US Composting Council, state the removal of food scraps from the landfills will lead to the highest value methane avoidance credit for the waste management industry. For each ton of wet food waste, there is nearly a one to one value associated with the reduction of methane, or methane avoidance. Help us make a better world for our children: let's compost school food waste on site while "growing" worm casings to nurture our gardens and landscapes!

The Compost Club was born at West Side School Elementary in Healdsburg, California. The composting operation started in 2003. In their first year, they created worm bins and diverted 900 lbs. from their school lunch food waste, then they sold the worm compost at their local farmers market and raised $900. For more info: www.compostclub.org.

LOCAL SCHOOL GARDENS -- THE LEADERS:

  • Novato Charter School, Novato: www.novatocharterschool.org This charter school also has a chicken coop and rabbits as well as a composting and recycling program. Each classroom is assigned a garden spot where projects are planned and implemented throughout the year. This has included building wooden bench/compost bins, an arbor, an adobe wood burning stove, tile art projects to beautify the school grounds.
  • Mary E. Silveira Elementary, San Rafael: www.marysilveira.org/
    This public school not only has a school garden, but also a pond, a chicken farm, and a school lunch recycling program that includes worm bins and composting of leftover lunch.
  • Edna Maguire Elementary, Mill Valley, www.ednamaguire.org
    Another local school "gone green"! Visit their website and hear their story via video. Truly inspiring!

SCHOOL GARDEN RESOURCES (download as PDF Document)
CALIFORNIA SCHOOL GARDEN NETWORK (CSGN): www.csgn.org
The California School Garden Network sprouted with the goal of facilitating the connection between resource organizations and educators by combining efforts to strengthen contributions and avoid duplications. The Network's mission to create and sustain California school gardens to enhance academic achievement, a healthy lifestyle, environmental stewardship and community and social development. The Network serves as a central organization to distribute school garden resources and support throughout the state.

FREE HOW-TO MANUAL: CSGN has published a free 96 page resource manual: Gardens for Learning: Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden. “This is a comprehensive guidebook that provides a strong foundation to support the growing school garden movement. It was developed by a team of experienced garden educators, nutritionists, state officials, and other garden experts. This guidebook is a must-have resource for anyone looking to enhance learning through the use of gardens in schools and other community settings.” Downloaded this publication at www.csgn.org/page.php?id=34 (Sample chapters: Cover & Introduction and Intro to School Gardens)

CSGN Funding info: Their “Grants and Fundraising” web page provides a list of funding resources to help you get started: http://www.csgn.org/page.php?id=30. You can also learn more about the California State Assembly Bill AB 1535 “The Instructional School Garden Program” which has allocated $15 million for the promotion, creation and support of California instructional school gardens: http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/r9/cisg06result.asp

HARVEST OF THE MONTH: www.harvestofthemonth.com
Harvest of the Month provides valuable nutrition education resources to students, teachers, families, and communities throughout California. This website provides a seasonal schedule (what to plant and when), an online training corner, Spanish menu slicks and translations of family newsletters. Type in a vegetable or fruit in their search box and download a 4-page pdf with everything about the produce: from history, nutrition content, how the produce grows, historical facts and fun hands-on activities and recipes. This is a program of the California Department of Public Health, Cancer Prevention and Nutrition Section.

A GARDEN IN EVERY SCHOOL: California Dept. of Education www.cde.ca.gov/ls/nu/he/garden.asp Download a free PDF of
A Child’s Garden of Standards: Linking School Gardens to California Education Standards -- Grades Two Through Six.

CENTER OF ECOLITERACY: www.ecoliteracy.org
The Center for Ecoliteracy is located in Berkeley California and is dedicated to providing educational resources and funding for sustainable living, which includes school kitchens and gardens. Their programs include “Rethinking School Lunch” www.ecoliteracy.org/programs/rsl, the “School Lunch Initiative” www.schoollunchinitiative.org produced in collaboration with Alice Water's Chez Panisse Foundation. The whole system approach includes gardens and the environment. The Center also provides a free school garden manual: A Guide for Creating School Gardens as Outdoor Classrooms that you can request at www.ecoliteracy.org/publications. Connecting the lunchroom to the school garden is vital in helping children to make better nutritional choices both at school and at home.

THE EDIBLE SCHOOL YARD: www.edibleschoolyard.org
Chez Panisse FoundationS' “The Edible Schoolyard”, in collaboration with Martin Luther King Junior Middle School, provides urban public school students with a one-acre organic garden and a kitchen classroom. Using food systems as a unifying concept, students learn how to grow, harvest, and prepare nutritious seasonal produce. Experiences in the kitchen and garden foster a better understanding of how the natural world sustains us, and promote the environmental and social well being of our school community. Check out their "How to Start a School Garden" to find additional resources.

CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION FOR AGRICULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM: www.cfaict.org
Their mission is to increasing awareness and understanding of agriculture among California's educators and students. What the future holds for agriculture will determine the quality of life for all…farmers and ranchers…suppliers…food processors…wholesalers… retailers…consumers. The California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom works with K–12 teachers, and students to enhance education using agricultural examples. We offer school children the knowledge to make informed choices. Some students will choose agriculture as their life's work. All students, as future voters, will make decisions about agriculture. Go on line and request a free teacher's resource guide.

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION COUNCIL OF MARIN: www.eecom.net
EECOM's Marin Food Systems Project (MFSP) provides action guides for schools www.eecom.net/mfsp/guide to serve as a resource to school groups seeking to make food and gardening an integrated component of school education. EECOM also provides a calendar of local events around sustainability and food issues.

MARIN MASTER GARDENERS: cemarin.ucdavis.edu/Master_Gardener Marin Master Gardeners has a new program to help schools start and maintain a school garden: “Marin County Master Gardeners School Garden Consultants”. These consultants volunteer in schools that request help with starting or improving their school gardens. The Master Gardeners provide information, advice, problem solving expertise and resources for school personnel, students and volunteers involved with the school garden.For more information: School Garden Consultants.

 

 

 
 
 
 

Garden layout
INTERESTED IN A NOVATO COMMUNITY GARDEN?
For More info ->

SCHOOL GARDEN RESOURCES
Updated Sept. 2008

Download a Handout

CURRICULUM RESOURCES
Download a Handout

HOW LU SUTTON BUILT A GARDEN IN ONE DAY
Download a Handout

SCHOOL GARDEN MATERIALS & COST GUIDE
A Link to the guide ->
This information guide outlines specific building materials, estimated costs, and budget needs to get a school garden started.

Harvest of the Month
Educational Classroom Resources on Fruits & Vegetables
www.HarvestOfTheMonth.com

THE NOVATO CHARTER SCHOOL:
School Garden Tour
Held
Tuesday, April 3, 2007
3:30-4:30 PM
Novato Charter School
Teachers, Staff & Parents interested in starting a school garden came and saw this award winning school garden. They shared ideas, learned about resources, and start planning their school garden.
About the Garden & Award>

DAYCARES & PRESCHOOL:Bench
The Garden of Eatin' at
Northbay Children's Center

Making a Difference

THE ORGANIC &
IPM APPROACH:
Wheelbarrow
Why organic?
What is Integrated Pest Management?
Why should I care?
Check out these resources:
www.OurWaterOurWorld.org
www.birc.org
www.pesticide.org
www.mcstoppp.org

www.BeyondPesticides.org